Services

What is a Home Inspection?

A home inspection is a non-invasive visual examination of the all visible and readily accessible components of a home. The components include but are not limited too Plumbing, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Electrical, Structure, and Interior and exterior. The inspection comes with an easy to report that notes all the components and their condition at the time if the inspection

Services

Residential Home Inspection

A residential or pre-purchase Home inspection is a non-invasive visual examination of the all visible and readily accessible components of a home. The Home inspector will inspect components including, but not limited to, Plumbing, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Electrical, Structure, and, Interior and Exterior.

Buying a home is your biggest investment and our team of certified home inspectors is here to help by providing you with information about the condition of the home you would like to purchase. Don’t leave anything to chance, our home inspectors will not only help identify issues with the home they will also look for conditions that can become worse over time. Residential home inspections help clients save money and prepare them for expenses that will come with the purchase of the home.

All residential Home Inspections come with an easy to understand home inspection report that notes all the components of your home and there condition at the time of the inspection Here is a breakdown of the components that are covered with your pre-purchase home inspection as per the standards set by the Ontario Association of Home Inspectors Covered Components:

  • roof
  • attic spaces
  • chimneys
  • exterior cladding
  • windows and doors
  • drainage and landscaping
  • fences and decks
  • foundation
  • insulation and air barriers
  • plumbing system
  • electrical system
  • heating and cooling systems
  • basements and crawlspaces
  • bathrooms
  • kitchens
  • flooring

Pre-Listing Inspections

A pre-sale Home Inspection is the same as a residential home inspection except the home inspector is performing the inspection for the seller not the buyer. In today’s real estate market homes often sell without buyers getting the chance to add a condition for a home inspection.

This can cost sellers money because potential buyers are not prepared to make an offer, or they offer less because they don’t know anything about the condition of the home. Take the mystery out of buying by providing potential buyers with a pre-listing home inspection report before they put in an offer. This gives buyers confidence and shows them that you have already factored in the current condition of the home into the price.

WETT Inspection

A WETT inspection is Fireplace or Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inspection and can only be performed by WETT certified home inspectors. They ensure that your fireplace meets current standards and are required by your home insurance provider.

A WETT inspection can be done with a standard home inspection or as a stand alone inspection. Your real estate agent should be able to tell you if you require a WETT inspection, An inspection for the wood burning technologies in your home is important for a number of reasons, not the least of which is the safety of you and your family. With wood burning appliances, the potential for harmful pollutants to be released into your home as well as combustible materials to ignite is increased, so it is important that these appliances are regularly inspected and properly maintained. If you have a home that already includes one of these features, or you would like to purchase one and have it installed in your home, having a WETT certified inspector or technician involved is a necessity. WETT specialty inspections are also now being required as a part of the home insuring process. In fact, many homeowners first hear about WETT specialty inspections because an insurance company asks that their appliances be examined by a WETT certified inspector. In Canada, insurance companies require homes using wood burning appliances to be thoroughly inspected by a professional and cleared/approved before the home can be insured.

If purchasing an older home that includes any of these wood-burning appliances, a WETT inspection is an absolute necessity. Cottages often include wood-burning appliances, and often the installation of these features is not in compliance with WETT standards. An inspection will be able to tell you whether or not these appliances are operating optimally, are in good structural condition, and that they burning in a way that does not compromise your health and safety.

Commercial Inspections

Our home inspectors also perform commercial property inspections. Like a residential home inspection, a commercial inspection is a non-invasive visual examination of the all visible and readily accessible components of the property.

The Home inspector will inspect components including, but not limited to, Plumbing, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Electrical, Structure, and, Interior and Exterior. The commercial inspection also includes thermal imaging and an inspection report. The inspection report will cover the following components.

  • The Structure
  • The Electrical System
  • The Heating System
  • The Air Conditioning System
  • The Ventilation System
  • The Plumbing System and Fixtures
  • The Roof Surface
  • Interior Components (Non Cosmetic)
  • The Exterior Wall Cladding
  • Visible Insulation Spot Check
  • Landscape Components including:
    • Walkways,
    • Driveways (excluding Sewers) and
    • Retaining Walls

Condo Home Inspection

A condo inspection is similar to a residential home inspection. The main difference is that the home inspector will focus on the interior components of the condo unit. The home inspector will identify all major components and assesses their condition in a detailed home inspection report.

The condo home inspection also looks for signs of problems such as water leakage, electrical, plumbing, or inadequate or malfunctioning ventilation that are typical of condominiums. The condition of flooring, walls, ceilings, fixtures, showers & bathtubs, windows and doors are also examined. The condo inspection does not focus on the common elements of the building or the exterior as these components are typically inspected and maintained by the condo board.

Renovation Deficiency

Sometimes the contractors you hire to do your renovation are not all they're cracked up to be. If you have or think you have issues as a result of poorly done renovations let us know. Our home inspectors will inspect the work and provide a detailed report that will identify deficiencies so you can make sure problems are fixed and the work is done right. If you are thinking about having a renovation done give us a call and we can recommend qualified and trusted contracted for every job.

Tarion Warranty New Home Inspection

Buying a new home does not guarantee that is was built properly. Similar to a residential home inspection our home inspectors will perform a top to bottom inspection of your new home. The main difference is that the home inspector will also document and comment on any cosmetic details for your Tarion warranty report.

This type of home inspection is often done during the pre delivery inspection ( PDI) that is performed with the builder. The home inspector will identify any major problems and cosmetic issues with property so that you can make sure the builder fixes them right away. The home inspector will create a report to detail any defects in the homes and this inspection report can also be used as an attachment to the PDI to let the builder know exactly what needs to be fixed in greater detail. Tarion new home inspection reports will save you time and money and ensure that your expectations are clearly communicated to your builder so they can fix issues with your home and you are not left with defects that are supposed to be covered by the builder.

Tarion new home warranties are also performed at 30 days, one year, two years, and seven years after you take ownership. Don’t get short changed by the builder because you are not thoroughly documenting all the cosmetic and non- cosmetic issues with your new home. The Tarion new home warranty is there to protect you and cover costs. Our home inspectors understand the scope of the tarion warranty and will ensure you get the most out of it.

Thermal Imaging Home Inspection

Thermal imaging is included as part of most home inspections but it is such an important home inspection tool that it can also act as a stand alone inspection. A thermal imager uses infrared technology and helps the home inspector find issues that the human eye cannot see.

With a thermal imager the home inspector can find defects hidden within walls and ceilings, under floors, or in attics. They are used to help find leaks, faulty electrical and plumbing components, HVAC problems, and poor insulation conditions .

Mold Inspection

A general mold inspection is a standard part of the home inspection. We use visual techniques aided by moisture meters and thermal imagers to identify the presence of mold. Mold is a common problem in many homes that can lead to adverse health effects. Once identified by the home inspector it is recommended to have to mold remediated or removed by a certified professional. It is also often necessary fix the adverse condition causing the mold growth. A more in depth mold inspection that includes air testing and mold identification tests is offered for an additional cost contact us for more details.

Mold In The Home

Micro-organisms can be found in the air inside a building, on a surface inside a building (on the floor, ceiling, walls and furniture), and inside the HVAC system of a building. Many of these micro-organisms come indoors from outside. They come from decaying organic matter or moist earth. Micro-organisms can enter the a building by floating with outdoor air that enters the building, or they can travel on people and animals who bring them inside. Micro-organisms might be present on the building materials as the structure is being constructed. Oftentimes, inspectors will find building materials lying on the ground at a new-construction site. These materials absorb moisture and dirt and may support mold growth inside the building, after construction has completed. Mold growth is not desirable in a building and must be prevented. There are three reasons to prevent fungal growth inside a building: the potential negative health effects of exposure to fungi and their byproducts; the effects of mold contamination on the structural integrity of the building; and the negative aesthetic effects fungi can produce both visually and on the human olfactory system.

Why Is Mold An Important Part of the Inspection

Inhalation exposure to mold indoors can cause negative health effects in some people. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants and, in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins). Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Mold does not have to be alive to cause an allergic reaction in some people. There are some specific groups of people who are potentially more easily or severely affected by mold than the average individual with no sensitivities to mold. They include infants, children, elderly people, individuals with respiratory conditions (such as allergies and asthma), and people with weakened immune systems (people with HIV/AIDS, chemotherapy patients, and organ transplant recipients). Sensitive people should avoid areas that are likely to have mold, such as compost piles, cut grass and wooded areas. Allergic reactions to mold in buildings do occur for many sensitive people. However, there is no conclusive evidence that proves that mold in a building directly causes human illnesses. More research is needed, and mold research has been continuous. Mold-related exposure and its effects on human health is a complex and emerging science.

Home Maintenance Inspection

Whether you have just moved in or have lived in your home for years a home maintenance inspection is always a great idea. A home maintenance inspection is performed by our certified home inspectors and is designed to give you insight into the components of your home and how to best maintain them.

The goal of the home maintenance inspection is to help homeowners properly maintain the home so that components can last longer and work more efficiently saving you money over time. Knowing the age and condition of the components of your home will also help prepare you for what repairs and replacements might be required down the road so you can better plan and budget.

FOLLOW THESE MAINTENANCE TIPS TO HELP KEEP YOUR HOME HEALTHY

JANUARY

  • Check and replace furnace filters.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.

FEBRUARY

  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Clean grills of wall furnace.
  • Clean range hood grease filter.
  • Clean water inlet filers of your washing machine. Check for leaks of hoses. Replace, when needed.
  • Vacuum lint ducts and surrounding areas of your clothes dryer.

MARCH

  • Replace smoke and carbon monoxide alarm batteries.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Check for frayed cords and wires; repair or replace as needed.
  • APRIL
  • Check and replace furnace filters.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Clean grills of wall furnace.
  • Clean range hood grease filter.

MAY

  • Clean air conditioners or schedule annual inspection.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.

JUNE

  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Clean grills of wall furnace.
  • Clean range hood grease filter.
  • Inspect caulking around tubs, showers and sink. Replace, when needed.
  • JULY
  • Check and replace furnace filters.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.

AUGUST

  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Clean grills of wall furnace.
  • Clean range hood grease filter.
  • Clean water inlet filers of your washing machine. Check for leaks of hoses. Replace, when needed.
  • Vacuum lint ducts and surrounding areas of your clothes dryer.

SEPTEMBER

  • Replace smoke and carbon monoxide alarm batteries.
  • Schedule annual furnace cleaning inspection.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Check for frayed cords and wires; repair or replace as needed.
  • OCTOBER
  • Check and replace furnace filters.
  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Clean grills of wall furnace.
  • Clean range hood grease filter.

NOVEMBER

  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.

DECEMBER

  • Check your fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. Replace when needed.
  • Clean grills of wall furnace.
  • Clean range hood grease filter.
  • Inspect caulking around tubs, showers and sink. Replace, when needed.

Inspect, Clean & Repair

Spring and Fall are great times to complete an exterior home check. Inspect your roof, siding, windows, and doors and repair where needed.

Spring

  • Inspect roofs surface, flashing, eaves and soffits.
  • Clean out gutters and downspouts. Inspect and repair weak areas; check for proper drainage.
  • Inspect and clean siding.
  • Inspect exterior caulking.
  • Fill cracks, caulk edges and repaint windowsills, doorsills and thresholds.
  • Clean window and door screens.

Fall

  • Inspect roofs surface, flashing, eaves and soffits.
  • Clean out gutters and downspouts. Inspect and repair weak areas; check for proper drainage.
  • Inspect and clean siding.
  • Inspect exterior caulking.
  • Inspect window and door weather stripping.
  • Clean your thermostat's heat sensor, contact points and contacts; check accuracy.
  • Turn off outdoor faucets and drain hoses.

Annually

  • Have a professional check your septic tank. Watch for back up through the year.